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Spanish prosecutors accuse Mourinho of 3.3 million euro tax fraud


Spanish prosecutors said on Tuesday they had filed a claim against Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho on two counts of tax fraud dating back to when he coached Real Madrid. The Portuguese manager owes Spanish tax authorities 3.3 million euros (2.91 million pounds), a Madrid prosecutor said in a statement, adding it had presented a claim to a local court.
Mourinho left Real Madrid in 2013 to manage English club Chelsea for a second spell before signing with United in 2016.
Prosecutors said he had failed to declare revenues from his image rights in his Spanish income tax declarations from 2011 and 2012, "with the aim of obtaining illicit profits". They said Mourinho had already settled a previous claim relating to his Spanish taxes, which resulted in a penalty of 1.15 million euros in 2014. But tax authorities later found that some of the information presented in that settlement was incorrect, the prosecutors said.
Known as "the Special One", Mourinho, 54, is one of the most prominent and successful coaches in soccer today.
In the season just ended, he won three trophies in his debut campaign at Manchester United, although he drew criticism after a poor league performance in which United finished sixth in the Premier League. In European competition, he has led Porto to UEFA Cup victory in 2003 and a Champions League triumph in 2004, and also won the Champions League with Inter Milan in 2010. He has claimed a haul of domestic trophies with Chelsea and other clubs.
The claims against Mourinho come amid a lengthening list of tax fraud cases involving soccer stars in Spain. Real Madrid player Cristiano Ronaldo has been called to testify on July 31 in Madrid on allegations that he hid income from tax authorities between 2011 and 2014, the court said on Tuesday.
Real Madrid was not immediately available for comment on the allegations against Mourihno or Ronaldo's hearing. Gestifute, a Portuguese-based soccer agency which represents Mourinho and Ronaldo, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Leipzig, Salzburg both cleared to compete in the Champions League


Bundesliga runners-up RB Leipzig and Austrian champions Salzburg can both play in the Champions League next season after UEFA said it was satisfied that energy drinks manufacturer Red Bull does not have a controlling influence in both clubs. The club financial control board of European soccer's governing body said in a statement on Tuesday that "no individual or legal entity" had a decisive influence over more than one of the two clubs.

UEFA rules do not allow any two clubs competing in European competition to share the same owner. In cases where that happens, priority is given to a team who are champions of their country -- meaning that Leipzig would have missed out.
Red Bull bought Austria Salzburg in 2005, renaming it Red Bull Salzburg, and then SSV Markranstaedt in 2009, giving it the name RB Leipzig.
It has argued that, following a restructuring, it no longer has a controlling stake in Salzburg and merely sponsors the club. Salzburg will enter the Champions League in the second qualifying round after winning the Austrian league last season.
Leipzig will go straight into the group stage after finishing second in the German Bundesliga in their first season in top-flight football.
UEFA said it had conducted a "thorough investigation" and that there had been "several important governance and structural changes made by the clubs". It said it would "continue to monitor both clubs to ensure that integrity rules are respected going forward".



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